Gender Respect Project 2013-2016

Aiming to help children and young people to understand, question and challenge gender inequality and violence.


Leave a comment

Gender Respect – Youth Effect: Friday 4th March 2016

Our national conference ‘Gender Respect – Youth Effect’ was a great opportunity to network with liked minded, passionate people who work with young people to give them a voice and help them to understand their right to respect, regardless of gender. The wealth of experience and the variety of professionals present enabled thought-provoking and stimulating discussions.

The day commenced with the inspirational and passionate feminist writer, Laura Bates. She is author of ‘Everyday Sexism’ and founder of ‘the everyday sexism project.’ The project promotes gender equality and is a place for people to record stories of sexism that occur on a daily basis. Laura spoke about how people can be complacent, and just accept that this is the way things are. She goes into schools and delivers talks to encourage people to speak out when they have been treated unfairly. Laura’s talk was shocking at times and contained statistics that were depressing, but she ended on a positive note, talking about how things are changing and people are feeling more able to speak out against inequality.

IMG_2617

Feedback from participants was very positive. Project teacher Stephen said ‘I was pleased to part of the day that could potentially change the lives of so many that face inequality. Similar to Laura I would like people to challenge inappropriate actions and comments that are so offensive and hurtful to other people. It needs to start with the young and it was good to see a workshop on Early Years Education. While disappointed that very few men attended the morning session, it was pleasing to hear the message that men are important to addressing change and that they should see themselves as people who can reach out to other men who are responsible for unacceptable behaviour.’

The day continued with an overview of the Gender Respect project and the scoping study, followed by a choice of 4 workshops:

  1.   Sexual Harassment and Masculinities – Interactive & practical ideas – how to facilitate discussions about these issues, encourage empathy, and enable safe, appropriate interventions.
  2. Challenging gender stereotypes – Practical ideas for lessons which develop critical and creative thinking and enable primary-aged pupils to make real choices in areas such as sport and careers.
  3.  ‘Doing Gender’ – How young children develop ‘masculinities’ and ‘femininities’ and how we can provide an EYFS environment that promotes gender equality. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to discuss the theory around how children develop gender identities and reflect on practical approaches across the EYFS curriculum.
  4. Period Positive Schools – A fun, informative and interactive workshop sharing results results and resources from Chella’s research on how to include all ages and genders in menstruation education.

These workshops were well received by all and involved lots of thought-provoking discussions.

In the afternoon, Jo Sharpen, children and Young People’s Project Coordinator spoke about the Chilypep project ‘Against Violence and Abuse (AVA).’ This project works with young people who have been affected by domestic abuse. It was interesting to hear about how professionals can work with children and young people through an empowerment and participation model to shape services and provision. It was inspirational to hear from some of the young people involved in the project. Project teacher Stephen said ‘It was good to hear how the project in the afternoon had empowered so many once victims to be strong leaders of change.’

Participants chose from 3 workshops for the afternoon:

  1. Where do we go from here? – An opportunity to explore the YWAVE research findings and develop ideas and pledges from services/professionals/communities. A discussion around the legacy of the AVA project in Sheffield.
  2.  In My Shoes –  Interactive session exploring young people’s experiences and perspectives when engaging with multiple services and professionals in relation to domestic abuse.
  3. Participation and Empowerment – A look at models for working with young people. Opportunity to critically think about our practice with young people, examine the benefits and learn new strategies that can be incorporated into our work.

IMG_2636

The day was a great opportunity for networking, encouraging one another and learning about the work of different organisations. Project teacher Stephen said ‘I would like the day to be seen as a growing platform of change across society and especially education. We need men and women to work together to address inequalities on all genders. We need to measure the success e.g. by more men working in early education, nursing, caring professions, politics and other STEM professions. We also need to measure a significant difference in the number of violent and abusive crimes against people within our communities.’

How did people describe the conference?

Wordle


Leave a comment

Teacher Blog: Carol

Debate Club

Week 2 (5 males, 14 females)

Question: Do we need the women’s equality party?

Responses:

  • It’s very exclusive to have a women only party.
  • Normal political parties should have more women. Women need to be more assertive & stand up for themselves in politics.
  • Women have some different concerns to men, for example men just think about war or business and women think about the NHS.

Concern about:

  • Unequal pay
  • The way women are shown in the media particularly sport
  • Unequal divide of labour at home

Stereotypes:

  • Expectations start early at school.
  • There are gender stereotypes: men do physical jobs e.g. electrician. Nurses are female and doctors are male. There are different male and female roles at home.
  • Women are limited by having to look after kids, where as men have their work as their main focus.
  • Women are not strong enough and feel intimidated in male dominated fields.
  • Concern from a boy about males being expected to be more violent and being treated unfairly as a result.
  • From the ‘olden days’, men were always taught to be a gentleman and to look after women as if women needed looking after. This could be why women may feel less confident.

Media:

  • In adverts, women are mainly seen as looking nice and doing proper jobs.
  • Girls & boys do separate PE and women’s sport gets very little coverage. There are not many role models.
  • Positive examples: the Virgin campaign shows women in sport and the ‘This Girl Can’ campaign.


1 Comment

Helen: One Billion Rising

OBR3Gender Respect project teachers, pupils and parents joined with other people from Sheffield to celebrate One Billion Rising on Saturday 14th February 2015.  Pupils had been introduced to the issue of gender-based violence through assemblies and lessons with the primary school linking the issue with their Rights Respecting Schools work.  The pupils were taught the dance in school and invited to join the event in central Sheffield if they wished to.

For a helpful article which links gender stereotyping in toys with violence against women see Let Toys Be Toys.

Here’s a YouTube clip from the event:

One Billion Rising YouTube film

 

One Billion Rising1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Teacher Blog: Carol

One Billion Rising

I delivered an assembly to Y11 students on Monday morning.  It was well received and the students were interested and engaged.  The PowerPoint adapted from the secondary one in the Teaching Ideas part of this site is to be put on the homepage of the school site and on rolling screens around the school.

The Year Leader commented: ‘Carol came in and gave an assembly to raise awareness of the ‘One Billion Rising’ movement and to promote the events happening in Sheffield on 14th Feb. The presentation gave an excellent background to the size of the challenge facing women globally and Carol used a combination of statistics, questions to the audience and visual images. The official video also really added to the overall impact. She had the full attention of all (c220) students and many commented afterwards on how powerful and interesting they’d found the assembly. We’re really grateful for Carol’s input. She was clearly well versed in these issues and pitched it just right for our Y11 students.’

Following the assembly several students approached pastoral staff about issues relating to gender based violence, some saying that they wanted to join in the dance. Judging by the students’ responses gender based violence seems to be something highly relevant and important to raise with secondary students while ensuring that pastoral support is in place for those students who have direct or indirect experience of it. The students welcomed the information about possible action that they could take on this issue.

 


Leave a comment

Violence and Prejudice Activities

Sue Lyle has given us permission to publish an article, ‘Violence and Prejudice‘, that she wrote for Creative Teaching and Learning (vol 5.1) which describes a number of activities using images which can be used to discuss some of the issues facing young people (particularly young women) today:

  • ‘girlification’
  • sexualisation and pornographication of society
  • pressure to achieve highly
  • class differences
  • search for the perfect body
  • dieting
  • self-harm
  • violence against girls and women
  • economic realities for women

As Sue says in the article ‘The activities are intended to promote discussion of values and promote principles of respect between young people and active participation’ and some teachers she worked with suggested that they could be used with pupils as young as nine.

Please let us know if you use or adapt any of the activities and how they went.


Leave a comment

Violence and Prejudice Activities

Sue Lyle has given us permission to publish an article, ‘Violence and Prejudice‘, that she wrote for Creative Teaching and Learning (vol 5.1) which describes a number of activities using images which can be used to discuss some of the issues facing young people (particularly young women) today:

  • ‘girlification’
  • sexualisation and pornographication of society
  • pressure to achieve highly
  • class differences
  • search for the perfect body
  • dieting
  • self-harm
  • violence against girls and women
  • economic realities for women

As Sue says in the article ‘The activities are intended to promote discussion of values and promote principles of respect between young people and active participation’ and some teachers she worked with suggested that they could be used with pupils as young as nine.

Please let us know if you use or adapt any of the activities and how they went.